Posts Tagged ‘News’

test.allTheThings() – Announcing General Availability of Real Device Cloud

March 31st, 2016 by Ken Drachnik

After months of beta testing with customers, we are announcing general availability for our Real Device Cloud today.  With the ability to test websites, native apps, and hybrid apps on both iOS and Android devices, we enable enterprise customers to easily scale their CI/CD testing needs on the most popular devices. By providing large numbers of each device type, our customers will not have to wait in a queue for their tests to run on a real device, thus speeding up the pace of testing, especially when running concurrent parallelized tests.  In conjunction with our mobile emulators and simulators, we now provide the most comprehensive automated mobile testing platform in the market, covering both web and mobile app testing needs across a variety of device types. After running your tests, view the results on our test details pages, with videos of each test, screen shots, logs and commands so you can resolve issues quickly and iterate on your app more frequently.  

To request a quote for real devices, contact your account executive.

Mobile Testing on Sauce Labs Includes:

  • Instant Availability – Get access to the most popular iOS or Android devices with no waiting, no queues and no reservations system.
  • Android emulators and iOS simulators covering over 140 device-OS combinations.
  • Massive Concurrency – Run your tests in parallel to dramatically reduce your total test time.
  • Integrate with your CI tool of choice – automate all your tests using the top CI tools like Jenkins, Bamboo, Microsoft VSTS, Travis, Team City or Circle CI.
  • Test native apps, hybrid apps, and mobile web –  all on the same platform.
  • Security – test with Sauce Connect, allowing your codebase to stay behind your firewall while utilizing Sauce’s extensive collection of OS platforms, browsers, and devices.
  • Pinpoint issues quickly with full reporting – instant access to videos, screenshots and all the data for your tests so you can analyse your results quickly.
  • Enterprise management features – account and team management lets you provision test resources as needed and SSO integration means you don’t have to go to IT to add another tester to your account.
  • Professional Services and Training – we have professional consultants and partners to help you get started with Appium and Selenium or if you’re already proficient, our experts can help your team become super users.

 

For more information, visit our Automated Mobile Testing Page

Sauce Labs Continues To Expand Senior Management Team With Two Key Hires

April 16th, 2015 by Bill McGee

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – Sauce Labs, Inc., the leading cloud-based web and mobile application testing platform, today announced it has appointed Tom Kress as Vice President of Sales and Lubos Parobek as Vice President of Product. The moves further support Sauce Labs’ momentum, equipping the company to meet the unprecedented demand for its web and mobile app testing platform. (more…)

Sauce Labs Appoints Technology Veteran Charles Ramsey as Company’s First Chief Revenue Officer

February 24th, 2015 by Bill McGee

SAN FRANCISCO, CA-  Sauce Labs, Inc., the leading cloud-based web and mobile application testing platform, today announced that it has appointed Charles Ramsey as the company’s first Chief Revenue Officer (CRO). Ramsey brings more than 25 years of industry experience and insight to his role at Sauce Labs. He will be responsible for all customer-facing areas, including sales, business development, and marketing, as well as continuing to build on Sauce Labs record 2014 results as the company extends its leadership position in the booming automated testing market.

“Charles is an innovative strategist, committed to building strong relationships with customers and partners,” said Jim Cerna, CEO of Sauce Labs. “His demonstrated ability to strategically grow companies will help us address the exploding demand we are seeing in the market for our technology. With Charles’ experience, leadership, and track record of repeated successes, we are poised to continue our rapid growth trajectory through 2015 and beyond.”

“Sauce Labs is well-positioned to take advantage of the dramatic proliferation of web and mobile apps across a variety of devices and operating systems. I look forward to working with the entire Sauce team to further the company’s market leadership and growth by bringing new levels of innovation, customer experience, and value to the marketplace,” said Ramsey.

Sauce Labs provides an instantly scalable testing cloud that is optimized for continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD). When tests are automated and run in parallel on virtual machines across multiple browsers and platforms, testing time is reduced and developer time is freed up from managing infrastructure. When paired with a CI system, developers can easily test web, hybrid and native applications early on in their development cycles, continuously and affordably. Sauce Labs currently supports more than 480 browser, operating system and device platform combinations.

Prior to joining Sauce Labs, Ramsey was an early member of the Quest Software management team, where he served as vice president of World Wide Marketing and Sales. He is a former Venture Partner at JMI Equity and has also served on the Board of Directors at notable companies such as Configuresoft, Inc. and ServiceNow, Inc. Early in his career, Ramsey rose to vice president, North America Sales for Computer Intelligence, a division of Ziff Davis, after beginning his career with the IBM National Accounts Division in a variety of sales assignments. He has a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, San Diego and a Master of Information Management from the American Graduate School of International Management.

Helpful Links

About Sauce Labs
Sauce Labs is the leading cloud-based web and mobile application automated testing platform. Its secure and reliable testing infrastructure enables users to run JavaScript unit and functional tests written with Selenium and Appium, eliminating the time and expense of maintaining a test grid. With Sauce Labs, organizations can achieve success with continuous integration and delivery, increase developer productivity and reduce infrastructure costs for software teams of all sizes.

Sauce Labs is a privately-held company funded by Toba Capital, Salesforce Ventures, Triage Ventures and the Contrarian Group. For more information, please visit http://saucelabs.com.

Sauce Connect Gets a Speed Boost & WebSocket Support

November 19th, 2014 by The Sauce Labs Team

Sauce Connect was designed with security as priority one. But given this technology’s critical position in your testing process we know that performance and utility are important, too. For that reason we have made two major improvements to Sauce Connect tunnels. (more…)

Test Automation Link Round-Up

November 13th, 2014 by Bill McGee
The Internet was kind to us last week. Here’s a quick round-up of some pieces on automated testing, Appium and other mobile test tools, and Sauce Labs. See below for snippets and links to the full articles.

 

Mobile testing tools are experiencing a growth spurt. New products and services emerge nearly every day, and the time and energy needed to evaluate them may make all the free trials in the world seem not so free. This article looks at several mobile testing tools, listing their benefits, features and tradeoffs to help testers and IT managers make smarter investment decisions. 
Click HERE to read more.

 

This guide provides a compendium of Selenium WebDriver resources to help beginners or advanced users learn about the Browser Test Automation framework. The guide also includes various other platforms and tools that allow you to build out a Test Automation Framework.
Click HERE to read more.

 

Use of automated testing software is gaining popularity for many reasons. Automated software testing enables an organization to leverage technology to perform mundane repetitive tasks efficiently, saving both time and cost. Another side effect of automating your test is that It gives you more time to create tests, increasing overall test coverage. However, these benefits come at a cost. Data shows that about 80% of Automation initiatives fail for various reasons. To ensure that the test automation is successful and offers maximum ROI, one should follow certain best practices. 
Click HERE to read more.
Have an idea for a blog post, webinar, or more? We want to hear from you! Submit topic ideas (or questions!) here.

Sauce Labs Named as One of the San Francisco Business Times’ Top 100 Fastest Growing Private Companies in the Bay Area

October 22nd, 2014 by Bill McGee

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – Oct 22, 2014 – Sauce Labs Inc, the leading provider of cloud-based mobile and web application functional and unit testing infrastructure solutions, today announced it has been ranked as 21 in the Top 100 Fastest-Growing Private Companies in the Bay Area by the San Francisco Business Times. The award is based on net revenue growth from fiscal years 2011-2013. Sauce Labs’ revenue grew by 378.4 percent during that time.

(more…)

Announcing CircleCI Integration on Sauce Labs

August 11th, 2014 by Bill McGee

Last week our friends at CircleCI showed us how to securely run cross-browser front-end tests on the Sauce Labs cloud using their hosted Continuous Integration service. We’ve long been advocates of good continuous integration practices and have developed a few plugins for some of the more common CI servers out there. We’re super excited to add CircleCI to our list and even more excited about how easy it is to get it going!

Continuous Integration in the Cloud

Continuous Integration, if you don’t already know, is the process of building your app frequently from a shared source code repository and running tests to make sure everything works. If your tests don’t pass and the build is not successful, the code that was checked in since the last good build is where the defects were introduced, and so problems are much easier to find and fix quickly.

Maintaining a local CI server can be a hassle. Anyone who’s spent any considerable time configuring Jenkins jobs with all it’s various plugins and tasks can tell you all about it. CircleCI, on the other hand, integrates directly with GitHub and can actually *infer* necessary settings directly from your code (if you’re following good development practices for that language and environment) and so many projects just magically build themselves on CircleCI without any additional configuration on your part. It’s like three clicks from zero to CI. Pretty sweet! If you do need to tweak or customize any settings, you can easily do so by describing those settings in a circle.yml file placed in your repo.

Running Tests on Sauce Labs Browsers

Sauce Labs is the world’s largest cross-browser client cloud. We host over 375 different configurations of operating systems and browsers so you can ensure that your app works on all the specific platforms and versions you need to support. These days that’s an ever-growing list! So it makes sense to run these tests with your continuous integration process so you know things work across the board and you don’t end up spending a bunch of time and trouble trying to hunt down bugs that were introduced much earlier in the development cycle.

Now, if your build deploys your code to a publicly accessible environment, CircleCI will simply execute your Selenium tests and you probably won’t need to configure anything, since Sauce Labs browsers will be able connect to that environment over the public network. However, if you want CircleCI to execute your tests locally in it’s build containers, you’ll need to use Sauce Connect.

Sauce Connect is a secure tunneling utility which allows you to execute tests behind firewalls via an encrypted connection between Sauce Labs and your testing environment. When you run Sauce Connect yourself, you typically do it from a command line or shell script and supply your Sauce Labs account credentials as parameters. With a CircleCI build, you’ll need to set it up in the circle.yml file so it can be launched as part of the build process and those tests can run inside the local container.

All that’s really involved here is telling the build task where to find Sauce Connect and how to start it up with your account credentials.

The first part is downloading and unpacking the Sauce Connect file, which you add as a custom dependency entry in your circle.yml:

	dependencies:
	  post:
		   - wget https://saucelabs.com/downloads/sc-latest-linux.tar.gz
		   - tar -xzf sc-latest-linux.tar.gz

The second part is to add your credentials, launch the tunnel, and check that it’s running before kicking off the tests. You’ll put these lines in the `test` section of circle.yml:

test:
     override:
        - ./bin/sc -u $SAUCE_USERNAME -k $SAUCE_ACCESS_KEY -f ~/sc_ready:
            background: true
            pwd: sc-*-linux
        # Wait for tunnel to be ready
        - while [ ! -e ~/sc_ready ]; do sleep 1; done

That’s all there is to it. You can find out the details here and see a full example on GitHub. And CircleCI has a nice little utility to help you add your credentials as environment variables so that they are not visible as plain text in the repo.

With CircleCI tackling all the necessary work involved in supporting your continuous integration process and Sauce Labs hosting the world’s most extensive cross-browser client cloud, you can be free of the costs and hassles of managing all these systems and grids and get back to focusing on the business of making great software.

Michael Sage, Principal Technology Evanglist, Sauce Labs

Michael Sage is a Principal Technology Evangelist at Sauce Labs. He helps software teams develop, deliver, and care for great apps. He’s lived through two or three technology revolutions and expects a few more to come, and finds the prospect incredibly exciting. A native of Philadelphia, he’s made San Francisco his home for over 25 years, but still can’t find a good hoagie there.

Updates Coming to Default Selenium and Chrome Versions on Sauce (August 2)

July 28th, 2014 by Santiago Suarez Ordoñez

On Saturday, August 2nd, we will update our Selenium and Chrome default versions to meet current, stable implementations. This update affects users that run automated Selenium tests on Sauce.

Default versions of Selenium and Chrome are used only for tests that don’t have a specified browser version. Users who choose to assign Selenium and Chrome versions to their tests will remain unaffected.

Below you’ll find more details about the updates.

Selenium

Currently the default Selenium version is 2.30.0. Following the update on August 2, the new default Selenium version will be 2.42.2. We advise you to test the new version (2.42.2) in advance using the following desired capability:

"selenium-version": "2.42.2"



If you run into any issues with the new default, note you can continue using the previous version (2.30.0) after Saturday by making the test request the selenium-version desired capability referred to below:

"selenium-version": "2.30.0"


Chrome

Currently the default Chrome versions are Chrome 27 and Chromedriver 1. Following the update on August 2, the new default Chrome versions will be Chrome 35 and Chromedriver 2.10. We advise you to test the new versions (Chrome 35, Chromedriver 2) in advance using the following desired capabilities:

"browserName": "chrome"
"version": "35"



By requesting Chrome 35, Chromedriver 2.10 will be used automatically.


If you run into any issues with the new default, you can continue using the previous versions (Chrome 27, Chromedriver 1) after Saturday by making the test request the “version” desired capabilities referred to below:

"browserName": "chrome"
"version": "27"


Troubleshooting Issues

If you see any issues after moving your tests to these new versions, we suggest checking for known issues on https://code.google.com/p/selenium/issues/list or contacting the Chromedriver and Selenium user groups.

Happy testing!

Announcing Cloud9 Preview: Instantly Preview Your Cloud9 Project In Any Browser (Powered by Sauce Labs)

July 24th, 2014 by Jonathan Lipps

Sauce + C9 IntegrationToday our friends at Cloud9 have released a brand new version of their powerful Cloud9 Development Environment, the web-based IDE that gives you unlimited flexibility to develop and test your applications directly from your browser.

As part of this release, we’re excited to announce an integration that we’ve been working on together for a while—the ability to instantly check out the site or app you’re developing in any desktop or mobile browser that Sauce Labs supports, directly in the Cloud9 interface.

Cloud9 has always given you the ability to easily preview the site you’re working on using your current browser. For example, in the screenshot below, you can see the preview window conveniently located where you can work on your code and see the changes reflected immediately:

cloud9 screenshot 1

Our integration simply adds another option to the drop-down menu to the right of the URL bar in the preview pane. If you click “Browser”, you’ll see additional options (it even remembers the last four browsers you used for quick access):

c9browsers

You can select any of our desktop or mobile browsers right from this interface. And if you’re already logged in to Sauce Labs, you’ll see the browser loading immediately. Now you can see whether your “responsive” website actually works as expected on, say, an iPhone Simulator, without ever leaving your IDE:

c9+saucelabs

We think this integration opens up a ton of possibilities for your development workflow, and are proud to be a part of the web-based IDE revolution with Cloud9. Check it out and let us know what you think!

Microsoft Launches IE Developer Channel; Win For WebDriver

June 20th, 2014 by Bill McGee

In light of the recent news about Microsoft  launching an IE Developer Channel that features WebDriver support, we asked our own VP of Engineering to comment on the story. His post is below – enjoy!

I think all web developers can identify with that fateful moment when you think your front-end project is finished, and then it dawns on you: time to start the painful process of cross browser testing and debugging. You may get up and walk around the office, procrastinate, look for conversations to start — but eventually you sit down and dive in. Historically Firebug was your main crutch; over time Chrome dev tools started to take hold – but eventually you find yourself waiting for your Windows VM to boot, so you can dive into IE’s latest and wait for the fateful popup stating something like, line 66, “Error: Object expected” – let the games begin.

The moment I saw Selenium IDE zooming through functional tests, I was more excited than I had ever been about development tools. The debug loop required to squash JavaScript bugs in IE from a Mac was so painful, and finally there was some automated hope in sight. I think we can all agree that Selenium RC left something to be desired — but trying to drive a browser against its will (and protective security measures) using JS was ultimately a losing battle for anything reliability.

However, reading the recent news from Microsoft announcing the IE developer channel made the DOM hacker inside me from 5 years ago breathe a sigh of relief. I think it’s fair to say that it’s better late than never — and the tools they are starting to ship look pretty cool. But what’s more — the new process and way they are looking at shipping features through a dev channel shows some promising potential for a better future relationship between dev’s and IE. On the Sauce Labs cloud we are still seeing ~19 percent of our jobs running against IE, and we don’t expect that to disappear anytime soon – as the IE market share still makes up for a pretty substantial amount of users, especially in regards to enterprise customers.

What’s even more exciting is the inclusion of the ability to enable built in WebDriver. At this point ~86 percent of Sauce Cloud usage is WebDriver instead of Selenium RC. The browser vendor support of for the WebDriver JSONWireProtocol specification, has driven the continued and significant growth of the community around client libraries and tools. The acknowledgement and delivery of a clean implementation of this spec for IE and inferred ongoing maintenance is a step in the right direction in order to make functional testing for IE straight forward and reliable. The ultimate stated goal of the Selenium project, is to move the entire implementation of the specification into the browsers – and this, in combination with the W3C working draft, are exciting steps in that direction.

At the moment, to take advantage of all this new goodness, you must be running a consumer grade version of Windows (not a server version), but they are aware of that and understandably wanted to get some progress out the door. We are looking forward to deploying this to the Sauce Cloud, so that our users can quickly get access to the latest and greatest.

I think the Selenium and developer communities should see this as a great sign that we are being heard, and supported, and to continue pushing hard to make development and testing tools first class citizens.

Adam Christian, VP Engineering, Sauce Labs

You can read the announcement and detail breakdown here. Get directions on how to enable and play with the new functionality in their documentation here. Sauce Labs is working to support this upon availability on server windows versions; stay tuned for updates upon release.