The Sauce Journey – Shu Ha Ri

August 25th, 2016 by Joe Alfaro

If you’re attempting to implement an Agile/Scrum development process where none has existed before, you will surely an encounter a moment of frustration on the part of your developers. “Why do we have to do these standups?” “I don’t understand why we need to assign story points, can’t we just get to the projects?” “Where is my technical specification?” Like Ralph Macchio in The Karate Kid, your developers may wonder why you have them doing the engineering equivalent of “wax on, wax off,” when what they really want to do is get into the fight. What Ralph Macchio eventually understands is that the performance of rote, rigid external exercises is a first step on the road to internal mastery, a process well known in the world of martial arts as Shu Ha Ri.

In its broader definitions, Shu Ha Ri describes a process of learning: in the Shu stage, the learner follows directions literally and adheres rigidly to whatever rules the teacher has set. In the Ha stage, the learner begins to see how the rules and directions can be adapted for specific situations, and exercises some judgement in how they should be applied. In the Ri stage, the learner has developed her own techniques, and now innovates freely as the situation demands. (more…)

Sauce Updates OnDemand Plugin for Jenkins Pipeline

August 10th, 2016 by Ken Drachnik

We have updated our OnDemand plugin for Jenkins with explicit support for Jenkins Pipeline. This update enables development and testing teams to easily create, manage, and run automated tests using scripts on Jenkins, resulting in faster testing.

The newly enhanced OnDemand plugin enables Sauce Labs users to skip the Jenkins UI and run tests directly via scripts. Previously, users had to work within the Jenkins UI to create testing tasks. While this is initially convenient, as automation grows and becomes more complex, the process of creating testing tasks becomes more complex, too. Now OnDemand enables testers to automate releases for complex and non-sequential tasks that previously required manual intervention.

Key benefits of the update include:

Create scripts to automate Jenkins operations
Save time by scripting test sequences that can automate testing, retry tests automatically and run processes in parallel. Developers and QA can more easily customize their Jenkins workflows and reporting results.

Automatically create test scripts for Jenkins
Use the Jenkins snippet generator to easily create Pipeline scripts to execute Sauce Commands via Jenkins. Users don’t need to know how to script in Pipeline – simply copy the code snippets to program workflows

The Sauce OnDemand Jenkins Plugin is available as a free integration. Download the plugin from Jenkins and read how to configure it on our docs page.

Happy Testing!

The Sauce Journey – Emergent Leaders

June 21st, 2016 by Joe Alfaro

In my last blog post I wrote about the way in which moving to SCRUM teams fosters communication, transparency, and trust, both internally among team members, and externally with customers. Achieving open communication like this is one of the main goals of Agile, but just as important is the development of leadership within the SCRUM teams.

Ideally, every SCRUM team is self-managing in regards to their own work. The Product Owner determines what will get done, the tactical decisions about how it gets done should be left up to the team. There is a simple philosophy behind this: those whose work focuses on a specialized area of the product know better how to improve it, and how much work will be involved, than anyone from outside of that group. The product owner within the team is there to advocate for the customer, and to decide when a minimally viable product is ready for release, but they don’t tell the team what to do or how to do it. (more…)

The Sauce Journey – Courage, Transparency, Trust

May 25th, 2016 by Joe Alfaro

In my last blog post, I described the first step on our journey from Engineering to DevOps, which was the formation of project-focused SCRUM teams. SCRUM brings many opportunities for improving the development process, but it’s wise to keep in mind the old saying “SCRUM doesn’t fix problems, it points them out.” This means that the very first thing to emerge from SCRUM is transparency, because it requires us to examine how our teams and processes actually function on a day-to-day basis, and through ceremonies like stand ups and retrospectives, we are asked to clarify our goals and purposes to our colleagues, our customers, and ourselves.

The essence of SCRUM ceremonies is communication, and communication leads to transparency. In standups, making a statement about what you plan to do that day, and what is blocking you, provides a simple way to bring transparency about your work to your team. But it also forces you to be introspective, to be clear to yourself about what you are doing, what the blockers and issues are, and what it is that you can accomplish. More than anything else, stand ups are opportunities for reflective communication that surfaces problems at the same that it seeks to resolve them and move the entire team closer to their goal. The same can be said of retrospectives, but here the emphasis shifts from internal to external communication. From the internal perspective, retrospectives are useful for documenting issues and how they were met, and then using that information for iterative improvement. But they are much more important for communicating to customers that we understand where our challenges are, and that we have ways to deal with them. (more…)

New: Use Atlassian Bitbucket with Sauce Labs

May 24th, 2016 by Ken Drachnik

The Sauce Labs Ecosystem & Integrations team is proud to announce our latest ecosystem integration: Sauce Labs for Atlassian Bitbucket Pipelines. Bitbucket Pipelines is a continuous delivery service built right within Bitbucket Cloud that gives developers end-to-end visibility from coding to deployment.

As more and more devs work in agile teams, they increasingly rely on their code repos to manage code, threads and bug fixes and many use Bitbucket. As a code collaboration tool, Bitbucket is an amazing tool for managing code across large teams.

With Sauce Labs and Bitbucket Pipelines, it is easy to launch your automated Selenium and Appium tests as part of your Bitbucket Pipeline build process. Sauce Labs allows users to reduce their overall build time to as low as a couple minutes through cloud based test execution and massive parallelization. You can also leverage the over 700 browser and OS combinations including real mobile devices through Sauce Labs for Bitbucket Pipelines.

Bitbucket Pipelines is currently in Beta. To enable Bitbucket Pipelines visit Bitbucket Pipelines Integrations. You can learn more about the Sauce Labs integration on our documentation wiki.

Also, visit the Atlassian Marketplace to see additional Sauce integrations available for JIRA and Bamboo.

Happy Testing!

Help Wanted – The Pivotal Role QA Can Play in Leading the DevOps Charge

May 9th, 2016 by Chris Riley

Faster, more frequent releases at a higher quality. That is all DevOps is. That’s not hard to understand. What is hard to accept, however, is how much organizations are neglecting the latter part of this equation. Not only does a lack of focus on quality slow down releases in the long term, it does not fit with the overall goal of DevOps.

DevOps for existing development organizations is hard to implement. Entrenched development shops not only do not have the option to stop everything and start over, they are also slipstreaming new processes and technologies into an existing process, and an already-established delivery pipeline. I have seen many organizations for which the transition has worked out great, and other times where it has fallen flat. But I’ve very rarely seen an environment where QA drives change. (more…)

Accessibility (AX) Testing in the DevOps Chain

December 28th, 2015 by Ashley Hunsberger
Image Source: http://simplyaccessible.com/accessibility/

Image Source: http://simplyaccessible.com/accessibility/

We often hear how important accessibility (AX) is for delivery, but we consistently see that it’s one of the first things cut as we get closer and closer to release (and we hope we’ll have the chance to properly address it later). As more companies embrace DevOps and Continuous models, how can we ensure that this extremely important aspect of development is no longer an afterthought?

Ensuring accessibility takes understanding of what AX is, asking the right questions during design and implementation, knowing the tools that are available to help you, and making accessibility part of your acceptance criteria (and therefore, making it part of your Definition of Done).

What is Accessibility?

Web Accessibility allows people with diverse abilities to use the Web1)https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility.php — for example, people with cognitive issues (such as autism and ADHD) or physical (blindness, auditory, etc.). I recommend reading Anne Gibson’s post. She provides insight on a wide variety of health issues which many people might never consider — that could happen to any of us at any time — and the user personae. (more…)

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