QTP/UFT VS Selenium [RECAP]

January 29th, 2015 by Amber Kaplan

selenium-logo-160x144Thanks for joining us for our last webinar, QTP/UFT VS Selenium, featuring Tarun Lalwani, QTP expert and author of QuickTest Professional Unplugged.

In this webinar, Tarun explains how we generated an 80% execution time savings by migrating client’s test suite from QTP to Selenium, along with answering the following questions:

  • How is Selenium different from QTP?
  • Why do I need to migrate to Selenium?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of the migration?
  • How do I plan the migration?
  • What challenges will I face during Migration?

Missed the presentation, want to hear it again, or share with a colleague?

Listen to the recording HERE and view the slides below.

Automated Testing News: Link Round-Up

January 23rd, 2015 by Amber Kaplan
Happy Friday! Here’s a quick round-up of some pieces on automated testing, why functional and performance testing should be done simultaneously, the case for Continuous Testing in the Cloud,  how to take your career to the next level, QTP/UFT VS Selenium, and what the top 10 tools were this week on Stackshare.  See below for snippets and links to the full articles.

Read the rest of this entry »

QTP/UFT VS Selenium [WEBINAR]

January 21st, 2015 by Amber Kaplan

selenium testing & sauceModern testing practices have shifted dramatically in recent years. As open source tools such as Selenium have begun to be accepted and incorporated into the enterprise testing landscape, proprietary tools like HP’s QTP/UFT have begun to be transitioned out in many cases. While there are many benefits to using a tool like Selenium (for example, it’s maximized when used as an automated testing tool, works with every browser, and plays nicely with all major computer languages and frameworks), the most compelling case to make the transition is the developer and QA time saved.

Join us for our next webinar, QTP/UFT VS Selenium, featuring Tarun Lalwani, QTP Expert and author of QuickTest Professional Unplugged. Hear about how we generated an 80% execution time savings by migrating client’s test suite from QTP to Selenium. We will also answer following questions:

  • How is Selenium different from QTP?
  • Why do I need to migrate to Selenium?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of the migration?
  • How do I plan the migration?
  • What challenges will I face during Migration?

Click HERE to register for our next webinar on Wednesday, January 28th, 2015, at 10:00am PST.

A live Q&A will follow at the end of the presentation.

Note: This is not a “how to” or “technology session” on Selenium or QTP. This is session is focused on giving you a understanding whether Selenium is right for you or not.

Don’t Miss This Appium Workshop At Mobile+Web DevCon On February 3 [Click For Discount Code]

January 19th, 2015 by Amber Kaplan
Appium logo w- tagline {final}-01
Attending Mobile+Web DevCon in San Francisco February 3-5? Join Isaac Murchie of Sauce Labs for a 3-hour Appium workshop before the main event on February 3 at 1:00 PM Pacific Time.

In this Lab, you will get a hands-on demo showcasing how to use Appium, a free open-source tool for automating mobile testing, that will highlight the following:
  • An overview of the tools available for writing tests in JavaScript, although you should note that with Appium you can test native, hybrid, and mobile web apps in any coding language and with any test framework.
  • Understand how to write tests in JavaScript in order to test web applications in mobile environments.
  • Learn how to execute your tests against the cloud of devices at Sauce Labs.
  • Discover the value of automated testing, including increased reliability of your applications as well as how to tune performance on different platforms.

Read the rest of this entry »

Vote To Help Appium Win A DeveloperWeek Award

January 9th, 2015 by Amber Kaplan

Appium logo w- tagline {final}-01Crowd voting for DeveloperWeek awards is open and will continue through January 15th. Appium was thrown into to the mix as a mobile developer tool of choice, so we’d love your help with voting! Appium is an open source, cross-platform mobile automated testing tool that was developed by Sauce Labs and a thriving community of open source contributors.

Voting is easy. Just follow these four steps:

  1. Register HERE to vote;
  2. Then, visit the Appium nomination page HERE;
  3. Click “Endorse” to vote for Appium;
  4. Share with your network.  Here’s some suggested copy:
    • Twitter: Help  win a award! Click here to vote until 1/15: http://ow.ly/H5fog 
    • LinkedIn: Help Appium, sponsored by Sauce Labs, win a DeveloperWeek award! Click here to learn how to vote until January 15th: http://ow.ly/H5fxJ
    • Google Plus: Help #Appium, sponsored by #SauceLabs, win a #DeveloperWeek award! Click here to learn how to vote until January 15th: http://ow.ly/H5fiu #mobile
    • Facebook: Help #Appium, sponsored by #SauceLabs, win a #DeveloperWeek award! Click here to learn how to vote until January 15th: http://ow.ly/H5ftV #mobile

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Cross-Browser Layout Testing With Galen Framework And Sauce Labs

January 8th, 2015 by Amber Kaplan

Every web developer faces this problem once the website is implemented: cross-browser layout testing. This is a very annoying task as you have to look at your website on a lot of different browsers. We used to perform a manual check on all these browsers at the end of website development, and as a result we get some layout issues and have to find hacks to fix these deffects. But what if we could automate layout testing of the website and perform it always in all major browsers? Imagine you follow a TDD technique in your front-end development and you want to have an early feedback on layout issues. To solve this problem you could have a look at Galen Framework.

In short Galen Framework is a layout and functional testing framework that has its own language for describing the layout. The way you test layout using this approach is by declaring a set of elements on the page and rules describing where each element is expected to be. The elements are being tested relatively to each other. This way you can make your tests very flexible and run them on different browsers and even mobile devices in case your website is responsive.

In this article I would like to show you how to write a basic layout test and run it in the SauceLabs cloud. SauceLabs offers various platforms and browsers and even allows you to choose browser versions. Lets take the major browsers like: Internet Explorer 11, Firefox, Chrome, Opera and Safari on Mac. The website under test will be http://testapp.galenframework.com.

Read the rest of this entry »

7 Tips For Maximizing Your Sauce Experience

January 6th, 2015 by lauren nguyen

Here at Sauce, we’re dedicated to helping teams bring quality applications to market faster and more cost-effectively. Our customers use Sauce in a variety of ways based on their development and deployment processes and setups, but there are a few practices that are common to a significant number of our users who run automated tests. We’ll talk about what 7 of these best practices are and their benefits. Read the rest of this entry »

We Automated 12 Android Phones To Sing ‘Appy Holidays To You [VIDEO]

December 23rd, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

With Holiday Season and the close of the fiscal year approaching, we brought in all of our remote workers to spend some time together. We had the obligatory corporate holiday party, a late-night LAN party, and countless, invaluable meetings that laid the foundation for software development projects in the new year.

Our VP of Engineering also arranged our first hackathon, in which we submitted ideas for programming projects that were tangentially related to our business. To participate, we were broken into teams and powered through our ideas and execution over two days.

Some of our developers have been interacting with Android phones, but haven’t had a chance to play with them. Thus, I ended up on a team of three with the goal of getting multiple Android devices to sing in harmony.

We’re happy to share the result of our efforts with this cheerful holiday video.

See the original video here. Follow the conversation on Reddit here and here and on HackerNews here.

So, how does it work?

We went with a pretty quick-and-dirty approach, seeing as this was a two-day event. Having multiple devices sync musical notes in realtime was definitely out of the question, so we opted for seeing if we could coordinate the phones to begin playing their individuals parts of a song at the same time.

Android devices are finicky and difficult to coordinate, many of their operations take varying amounts of time, even on identical devices. Simply pushing a song to each of them and telling them to play, results in some phones playing within a second while others can be up to four seconds behind.

Here’s what we did:

@classam wrote a python script which takes any MIDI file and distributes its separate instrumental parts onto an arbitrary number of tracks. It’s pretty neat: specify just two tracks, and half the parts of the song will be played on one track, and half on the other. If you specify more tracks than available parts, it copies the more significant parts onto the leftover tracks so every phone will feel like it’s a valued member of the choir.

I wrote an Android app which runs on the phones. The app runs on each phone and listens on a socket. When it gets the ‘GO’ command over the USB cable, it plays the music file it’s been given. It also displays a musical visualization of the sound it’s playing so you can match up the phones to the sounds you hear.

@etmillin wrote a javascript program which finds all the Android devices connected to a computer, gets a connection to the song App running on each one, and sends the ‘GO’ command to all of them at once.

When you glue our three pieces together, the following happens:

  • A MIDI song gets broken into parts, one for each phone
  • The parts of the song get uploaded, one to each phone
  • The song-playing app gets started on all the phones
  • The ‘GO’ command gets sent to all the phones at once

Now they all play together!

Other hackathon projects included experimenting with different types of network messaging solutions, devOps management tools, ECMAscript7, contributing to open source projects like Travis CI, and building hardware which displays the state of our continuous integration build.

Be warned, we didn’t polish the code for this blog post but you can find it on github: https://github.com/classam/5rat

-Jonah Stiennon, Ecosystems, Sauce Labs

Want to work at Sauce Labs? Submit your resume! https://saucelabs.com/careers

Mobile Testing Talk: What’s New With Appium [RECAP]

December 19th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

appium_logo_with_sauce_NEW

Thanks for joining us last week for our latest webinar, Mobile Testing Talk: What’s New With Appium, which featured Jonathan Lipps, the Chief Architect for the Appium Project.

To recap, Jonathan gave listeners a tour of Appium version 1.3.x, including the stability improvements and features the team has added since the Appium 1.0 release back in May of 2014. He also touched on the following:

  •  Appium 1.3.x release features and improvements
  •  New platforms
  •  Better hybrid support
  •  Examples of maturing Appium clients & more

We had great feedback on the content and an influx of interesting questions that got addressed in the Q&A at the end.

Missed the webinar, need to hear it again, or want share it with your team? Check out the slides below Read the rest of this entry »

Application Security Testing Gets Tasty With Sauce Labs And NT OBJECTives

December 15th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

Finally, a win-win-win for development, QA, and security! If your development team is looking for easier ways to incorporate security earlier in a way that’s simple, easy and that your team to understand, we may have a solution for you. Security defects are like any other defect. Finding them early saves money and time. There are tools that execute security tests for security professionals – like NT OBJECTives’ NTOSpider. NTOSpider can use the application knowledge defined Selenium scripts to execute a better, more comprehensive security test on an application. Read the rest of this entry »