Ask a Selenium Expert: Strategies for Cross-Browser Testing

April 23rd, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

selenium testing & sauceThis is part 4 of 8 in a mini series of follow-up Q&A’s from Selenium expert Dave Haeffner. You can read up on the firstsecond, and third.

Dave discussed  how to build out a well factored, maintainable, resilient, and parallelized suite of tests that run locally, on a Continuous Integration system, and in the cloud in our recent webinar, “Selenium Bootcamp“.

Following the webinar, we had several follow-up questions. Dave’s agreed to respond to 8. Below you’ll find the third Q&A. Stay tuned next Wednesday for the next question.

3. ­I would like to see strategies for getting tests to work in multiple browers. For example, if my test works in Chrome but not Firefox, what do I do?

There are two things you’re likely to run into ­when running your tests across multiple browsers: speed of execution, and locator limitations.

Speed of execution issues occur when things execute too quickly (which indicates that you need to add explicit waits to your test code) or timeout (which indicates that the explicit waits you have are too tight and need to be loosened). The best approach to take is an iterative one. Run your tests and find the failures. Take each failed test, adjust your code as needed, and run it against the browsers you care about. Repeat until everything’s green.

In older browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer 8) you’ll be limited by the locators you can use (e.g., CSS3 nth locators like nth-child, nth-of-type, etc) and likely run into issues with some dynamic functionality (e.g., hovers). In cases like this, it’s simple enough to find an alternative set of locators to use that are specific to this browser and update your test to use them only when this browser is being used.

-Dave Haeffner, April 9, 2014

Can’t wait to see the rest of the Q&A? Read the whole post here.  Get more info on Selenium with Dave’s book, The Selenium Guidebook, or follow him on Twitter orGithub.

Have an idea for a blog post, webinar, or more? We want to hear from you! Submit topic ideas (or questions!)  here.

Win A Gift Package From Sauce Labs (Twitter Contest)

April 17th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

Have you seen our Test All The Things t-shirts on the twitterverse yet? We get a lot of compliments on them (thanks, we’re blushing) and a lot of requests for them, too. Although they’re not available for purchase on the site, we thought we’d do a fun giveaway for a couple of lucky winners. Plus you never know, you could get a few spicy accoutrements to go with it.

The contest is easy. Rules below:

  • If you’re not already doing so, follow us on Twitter: @saucelabs
  • Then, retweet the embedded tweet below OR any more updates that we post about this contest on Twitter. Bonus points for including our hashtag, #TestAllTheThings, and for using our handle, @saucelabs.
  • A lucky person who’s retweeted one of our contest messages will win a care package.
  • Our 5,000th follower will also win a care package.
  • The more often you retweet us or mention the contest, the better! Hey, we never said we weren’t biased.
  • Both retweets and modified tweets will be counted.
  • Contest will close on May 15 or after we get our 5,000th follower; whichever comes first.
  • We’ll notify winners via direct message on Twitter.

You know you want it! Good luck, Saucers.

Follow us and retweet this message for a chance to win gift package from Sauce Labs!

Sauce Labs Makes Testing Awesome (VIDEO)

April 17th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

Sick of maintaining test infrastructure? Can’t keep up with supporting the latest Firefox or Chrome? Let Sauce help! We’re on a mission to make testing mobile and web applications fast, easy and affordable for developers. 

With support for 300+ browser / OS platforms, Sauce Labs make running and scaling Selenium, JavaScript Unit testing, and mobile testing a breeze. Watch the video below to learn more, or just visit saucelabs.com. It’s free to get started.

Ask a Selenium Expert: Selenium Test Report Example

April 16th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

selenium testing & sauce

This is part 2 of 8 in a mini series of follow-up Q&A’s from Selenium expert Dave Haeffner. Read the first Q&A here.

Dave joined us and led our recent webinar, “Selenium Bootcamp“, wherein he discussed  how to build out a well factored, maintainable, resilient, and parallelized suite of tests that will run locally, on a Continuous Integration system, and in the cloud.

He’s also agreed to respond to 8 of the many follow-up questions we received post-webinar. Below you’ll find the second Q&A. Stay tuned next Wednesday for the next question.

2. ­Can you please show some examples of a Selenium test report?

Here are two examples:

-Dave Haeffner, April 9, 2014

Can’t wait to see the rest of the Q&A? Read the whole post here.  Get more info on Selenium with Dave’s book, The Selenium Guidebook, or follow him on Twitter orGithub.

Have an idea for a blog post, webinar, or more? We want to hear from you! Submit topic ideas (or questions!)  here.

You’re Invited: Appium 1.0 Launch Party! RSVP Today

April 15th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

Sauce Labs is thrilled to announce we’re sponsoring and hosting the Appium 1.0 launch party at our new San Francisco office on Friday, May 2, from 7-10 PM!

Sauce Labs’ own Jonathan Lipps, chief architect of Appium, will be releasing Appium 1.0 at the party. We’ll celebrate with food, refreshments and merriment – and if you’re an Appium or mobile enthusiast, we want you there, too! Appium 1.0 could not have happened without massive support and work from the Appium community, and we want to toast the launch with all of you.

Mark your calendars for May 2. Space is limited, so make sure to RSVP here for a ticket. See you there!

appium_logo_final

About Appium
Appium is an open source, cross-platform test automation tool for native, hybrid and mobile web apps. Appium is built on the idea that testing native apps shouldn’t require including an SDK or recompiling a mobile app. Appium enables you to automate any mobile app from any language and it lets you use your preferred test practices, frameworks, and tools. For more information, see http://appium.io.

Don’t Miss the Gain and Engage Users Workshop on April 25

April 14th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

San Francisco App Strategy Workshop  Optimization   DevsBuild.ItIf you missed out on tickets to the Front End Ops Conference, never fear: we have another fantastic event for you!

Sauce Labs’ Mark De Visser will be speaking about testing and performance at 11:30 AM on Friday, April 25 in San Francisco at the Gain and Exchange Users Workshop by the Application Developers Alliance.  He’ll be speaking along side folks from New Relic, AT&T, Open Table, and more.

For more about the event, see below:

Join developers, analytics experts, and leading app publishers and platforms to learn about tools and strategies to understand your users, boost retention, and drive downloads. Take a deep-dive into app store optimization and explore ways to get your app discovered.

The Gain & Engage Users Workshop is part of a nationwide App Strategy Workshop series complete with 15 events. Click here for event information and to view related videos.

Check out the rest of the schedule and register here. Don’t miss this great workshop – it’s the furthest $10 will ever get you in San Francisco!

Regarding Heartbleed and Sauce Labs

April 11th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

In the wake of the disclosure of CVE-2014-0160, also known as “Heartbleed”, Sauce Labs has been working to assess the impact of this issue on our users.

While we have not found any signs that Sauce Labs or its users were negatively impacted by the Heartbleed vulnerability, we take security very seriously and are taking steps to remediate any exposures relating to it. This blog post is part of that effort.

We have determined that the Heartbleed vulnerability has no impact on the Sauce Labs web interface or REST API. However, Sauce Connect is affected by the vulnerability. Users of Sauce Connect should read more below.

Again, if you are not using Sauce Connect, this vulnerability had no impact on your Sauce Labs tests. For the Sauce Labs web interface and REST API we use an unaffected version of OpenSSL. This can be validated here:

heartbleed

IMPORTANT: For Customers Using Sauce Connect

For our customers who use Sauce Connect to test their applications behind their firewall, we have no specific evidence that data has been compromised. We have now updated our Sauce Connect servers so they are no longer vulnerable to new attacks enabled by the Heartbleed bug.

During the period of time when the Sauce Connect servers were vulnerable, attackers may have gained access to customer test data (traversing the Sauce Connect tunnel). If that has occurred, attackers may have the ability to similarly compromise future Sauce Connect 4.0 and 3.0 sessions. Again, we have no specific evidence that this has actually occurred.

As part of closing this potential vulnerability we have updated our certificates for Sauce Connect in version 4.1, and released a version 3.1 with updated certificates for those customers who prefer to stay with the 3.x line for now.

Customers will need to:

  • Upgrade to Sauce Connect 4.1 or 3.1 as soon as possible:

Sauce Connect 4.1
OS X: https://saucelabs.com/downloads/sc-4.1-osx.zip
Linux: https://saucelabs.com/downloads/sc-4.1-linux.tar.gz
Windows: https://saucelabs.com/downloads/sc-4.1-win32.zip

Sauce Connect 3.1 (cross-platform):
https://saucelabs.com/downloads/Sauce-Connect-3.1-r32.zip

  • Change all passwords that could potentially have been affected if an attacker did have access to test sites and commands.

We hope this email answers your questions about the impact of CVE-2014-0160 on your Sauce Labs applications. Feel free to reply back to this email to reach our Customer Support team with follow up questions.
Sincerely,

The Sauce Labs Team

Ask a Selenium Expert: Convert a Selenium IDE Script to Use Webdriver

April 9th, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

selenium testing & sauceThis is part 1 of  8 in a mini series of follow-up Q&A’s from Selenium expert Dave Haeffner.

Dave was kind enough to join us for a recent webinar, “Selenium Bootcamp“.   Topics included how to build out a well factored, maintainable, resilient, and parallelized suite of tests that will run locally, on a Continuous Integration system, and in the cloud.

He’s also agreed to respond to 8 of the many follow-up questions we received post-webinar. Below you’ll find the first Q&A. Stay tuned next Wednesday for the next question.

1. Is converting my Selenium IDE script to a programming language to start using webdriver sufficient?

You may get some value out of exporting your existing IDE tests, but they will likely require a good amount of clean-up. You’re likely to get more value out of identifying a few pieces of core functionality in the application you’re testing, and writing new tests for this functionality in a programming language from scratch.

-Dave Haeffner, April 9, 2014

Can’t wait to see the rest of the Q&A? Read the whole post here.  Get more info on Selenium with Dave’s book, The Selenium Guidebook, or follow him on Twitter or Github.

Have an idea for a blog post, webinar, or more? We want to hear from you! Submit topic ideas (or questions!)  here.

Webinar: Selenium at Salesforce Scale – Register Today

April 3rd, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

sfdc-logoEver wondered how an Enterprise company like Salesforce runs their QA tests? Yup, there’s a webinar for that.

After participating in this successful meetup, we wanted to cast this knowledge even farther. You’re invited to learn about Salesforce’s inventory of Selenium tests, how they run them at scale, and how to architect your test harness for success.

Join Salesforce engineers David Louvton and Sagar Wanaselja on Wednesday, April 16th, 2014 at 10:00am PDT for our latest webinar, Selenium at Salesforce Scale.

David and Sagar will cover the details of their engineering team, running their “Selenium farm,” scaling issues, Selenium design patterns, and how to overcome test failures.

A Q&A session will follow. Register today!

As usual, this event is FREE.

Do you want to share your knowledge with our community? We want to hear from you! Submit topic ideas for guest posts, webinars and more here

Guest Post: Cross-Browser Selenium Testing with Robot Framework and Sauce Labs

April 3rd, 2014 by Amber Kaplan

Robot FrameworkEver wondered how to keep your Selenium tests up-to-date with your ever-changing user interface?

Sauce Labs customer Asko Soukka set out to answer just that in his post, “Cross-Browser Selenium Testing with Robot Framework and Sauce Labs”.

See a snippet below:

Do you try to fix your existing tests, or do you just re-record them over and over again?

In the Plone Community, we have chosen the former approach (Plone is a popular open source CMS written in Python). We use a tool called Robot Framework to write our Selenium acceptance tests as maintainable BDD-style stories. Robot Framework’s extensible test language allows us to describe Plone’s features in a natural language sentences, which can then be expanded into either our domain specific or Selenium WebDriver API based testing language.

-Asko Soukka, datakurre.pandala.org, March 20, 2014

Asko walks you through the process of installing Robot Framework, writing and running a Selenium test suite in Robot, to refactoring that suite to run cross-browser on Sauce Labs. Be sure to check out the rest of his excellent post and tutorial here.

Do you have a topic you’d like to share with our community? We’d love to hear from you! Submit topics here, feel free to leave a comment, or tweet at us any time.